10:52 PM


Hello & Welcome back to my blog.... Above you see the daguerreotype I sent  Frank DeFreitas to see if he could make a hologram (3-D image).

I initially blogged about this May 19, 2010  and finally succeeded about a month ago. 

He wanted to know more about this image and all I could say was its in an 1840s mat and thanks to Joan Severa, my clothing expert, she once again, opened me up to the fashions prior to the 1850s.

Enjoy the emails, back and forth- and for those that sew, you'll enjoy reading every word.

Hi Joan,
Hope you are staying inside! And you are OK-
I know you'll like this dag....Frank a hologram photographer made a hologram of this dag and now is writing an article for the Dag
Newsletter. He wanted to know about the image and so I am writing you will some close up details. Maybe you are rubbing off on me. I see a bell sleeve- and the bow she's wearing has a wonderful leaf pattern.

So, all I know is the mat is 1840s- what do you see?
Elizabeth

Elizabeth--
This portrait was made ca. 1846, when the slwwv
Joan
Elizabeth--
This is a lovely shot of daydress , ca. 1847. The bell sleeve you noted is still quite modest, as it was just introduced in 1846 magazines. The undersleeve too is extremely plain, narrow and made to close at the wrist. The very open bell came about in the '50s, when undersleeves were either large puffs banded at the wrist, or open bells with lace edging. The boned bodice has a long but rounded frontal dip, indicating the last half of the '40s. It is finished with piping, and the skirt fullness is accomplished with cartridge pleats, a typical '40s technique. You will remember that she cannot be wearing a hoop, as they were not in use in America much before1855.
About the neck bow--the general effect, before the closeup, made me think lace--that rather coarse kind, with worked motifs. If you think it's printed, I bow to your better eyesight. Printed neck ribbons were more common, but most were plaid.

The hairdo, always so telling, is definitely late '40s: from a center part, frontal hair was carried down to the earlobe, then bent up to fasten at the crown. Back hair was drawn up separately to this fastening, and made into a bun or a twist, leaving the neck bare. The loop of hair at the ears was variously puffed out throughout the end of the '40s and the entire '50s--sometimes with extra hair, which could be bought in "switches" in specialty shops.

While the dress is made of expensive silk, and is professionally sewn, the plainness of the cut and lack of frills make me think of religious dress restrictions--except for the neck ribbon, and all the gold jewelry!. Anyway, a not-poor young woman of rich but conservative taste.
And thanks--this brightened up my day.
Joan

Elizabeth---
Forgot one sure clue: the small collar. 1850 saw the introduction of wide collars--the sitter here wears a typical '40s collar.
Joan

Hi Joan,
You never cease to impress me! I feel like I am in a fashion show when you describe the dress. This is all good info for Frank, thanks a lot for brightening my day.
True story, I was in my elementary school fashion show in the 6th grade. My mom narrated the PTA show in the all purpose room. It was the 60s and I wore a Marlo Thomas "That Girl" type dress and navy cape with a white straw bowl hat and a peach "poke a dotted" two piece bathing suit. It was the new fad called bikini and boy did I get kidded during recess. LOL-
Elizabeth